Tips and Tricks

Whether you're a stroke survivor learning to accomplish tasks with only one hand or a family caregiver who needs help managing this challenging role, you're not alone! There are many others doing the same and some of them share their great ideas with us. Take a look at some of the great adaptive ideas and guidance we've gathered from stroke families. 


 

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Tired of Feeling Guilty?

If you intentionally inflict physical or emotional pain on another person, guilt is an appropriate emotional response. If you have not intentionally injured another person, you may be experiencing feelings of guilt that are not appropriate to the situation.

Getting the Most Therapy Coverage

Getting more therapy is not as simple as asking nicely. You must understand your insurance benefits and discuss them knowledgeably with your insurer.

Preparing for a Backup Caregiver

Thinking ahead and preparing for a backup caregiver can help ease some of the anxiety for you and your loved one and assure that things go smoothly while you are away.

Managing the Cost of Prescription Medicines

Most stroke survivors leave the hospital with several prescriptions. The cost of these can be a significant blow to any budget. Find out about resources that may help.

Kitchen Mobility, Kitchen Stability

Recently, I was asked a question about a subject I hadn’t paid much attention to in a while: balance, the kind of balance it takes to move around a kitchen and reach for things safely. Stroke definitely can affect your sense of balance. It did mine in the early post-stroke years, and I did have to take special care in the kitchen. Here are some suggestions about cooking and balance.

Strokes, Strikes & Spares

A few years after his stroke, David Layton rediscovered bowling. He’s setting and achieving new goals for himself and having a great time doing it. Check out his video with tips for one-handed bowling.

Fishing with One Paw

Kim Mullens is an exuberant spirit — you can hear it in her voice, punctuated with laughter and memorable phrases: "There are good days and bad days — sometimes you’re the windshield, sometimes you’re the bug." In 1995 when she was 38, a tear in her carotid artery left her "with one paw," that kept her from working because she couldn’t climb into the cab of the CAT 966 earth-moving equipment she operated.

Talking Tech

Technology expands communication opportunities for people with aphasia.

Long-Term Care Options

There are various reasons why a family member may be unable to care for a stroke survivor at home. Depending on the survivor's needs, there are several options to investigate.

Taking Control

Understanding and managing post-stroke incontinence

Recreation Can Help With One-Side Neglect

Adapting hobbies and other fun activities to help survivors improve one-side neglect.

Peeling an Orange with One Hand

Don't pass up on a scrumptious orange, peeling it with one hand can be done.

Managing Caregiver Expectations: Recovery

Most people choose the role of family caregiver with little or no knowledge of what they’re getting into. Stroke is a sudden occurrence that requires many decisions to be made very quickly.

Washing Under Your Unaffected Arm

Here was my challenge: when bathing, how to wash under my “good” arm considering I cannot use my affected arm and hand?

Managing Caregiver Expectations: The Medical Team

The third of a three-part series on how to use journaling as a method to help manage expectations across different aspects of your caregiving experience.

It CAN Be Done!

It’s often the very simple two-handed tasks, when approached with one hand, that seem to morph into monstrously frustrating and anything but the simple tasks we used to know. Case in point, opening cans and jars.

Tips from Survivors: Fingernail Grooming & More

Two great tips for caring for your nails with the use of only one hand plus advice for shoes, dental floss and a device that helps when peeling fruits and vegtables.

Helpful Communication Apps After Stroke

Apps and websites that may be helpful for stroke families.

Folding Laundry One-Handed

Step by step instructions that simplify folding with the use of only one hand.

Managing Caregiver Expectations: Family & Friends

The first of a three-part series on how to use journaling as a method to help manage expectations across different aspects of your caregiving experience.
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Unexpected Expenses After Stroke

Things to consider as you’re working on recovery

Getting the Most Therapy Coverage

Managing the Cost of Prescription Medicines

NeedyMeds

NeedyMeds is a national non-profit organization that maintains a website of free information on programs that help people who can't afford medications and healthcare costs.

Patient Advocate Foundation

Patient Advocate Foundation's Patient Services provides patients with arbitration, mediation and negotiation to settle issues with access to care, medical debt, and job retention related to their illness.
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Stroke Survivor Goes Back to Work . . . for Herself

As I approach the eighth anniversary of being in private practice, I think about how it all came about and how if I hadn’t had a massive hemorrhagic stroke, I might not have been so bold as to open my own business.

The ADA Turns 25

Starting in the ’70s, the disability rights movement learned an important lesson from the civil rights movement and got organized. Their goals were the elimination of attitudinal, communication, transportation, policy and physical barriers so as to integrate people with disabilities into society.

Returning to Work After Stroke

For many younger survivors, going back to work is often the measure for recovery. Here's some excellent guidance if you're working toward getting back into the workplace.

Working My Way Back

My journey started on September 8, 1995 at 5:30 p.m. I was 47. I got up from my chair and said I did not feel good and then collapsed onto the floor.