Survival Journeys

Though strokes often have common effects, each one is also different. And each stroke survivor's journey is as unique as the individual themselves. Survival Journeys features stories by and about stroke survivors, sharing their experiences and insights.


 

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Enjoying My Second Chance

At age 13 I experienced a grand mal seizure. I was scared to death. Seizures were soon a common occurrence in my life for the next 34 years. Eventually during one hospital stay it was discovered that I had an arteriovenous malformation (AVM).

But You Look So Normal

By now I am used to the odd looks people give me when I say that I’ve had a stroke.

Confessions of the Lucky One

I survived a stroke in 1994 at age 51. The physical aspects of recuperating from that stroke were no easy task, but the mental deficits continue to be more difficult.

1000 to One: The Cory Weissman Story

What’s the difference between one and a thousand? For Cory Weissman,it’s a whole new life.

The Mother of Invention

Get to know the survival journey of Rosanna Radding, our Tips & Tricks columnist and founder of OneHandCan.com.

Uncommon Survivors

This companion piece to Uncommon Causes profiles several survivors who experienced strokes due to less common causes.

A Survivor in the Senate

Stroke survivors do not always return to work. Even when they do, it’s safe to say that they are not welcomed back by the Vice President of the United States.

Moving From the Minors to the Majors

Sometimes you strike out more times than you hit a home run. Life is about handling the strikeouts — adjusting your strategy after each pitch, adjusting your swing after a strike and being ready for the next pitch.

Teri Ackerson's Why

Being a stroke coordinator for a hospital in the Kansas City area helped her know what to do and stay calm when she experienced a stroke herself in 2013.

Working My Way Back

My journey started on September 8, 1995 at 5:30 p.m. I was 47. I got up from my chair and said I did not feel good and then collapsed onto the floor.
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Archive »For Survivors

What to Expect in Stroke Rehab

Following a stroke, about two-thirds of survivors receive some type rehabilitation. In this second of our two-art series, we want to alleviate some of the mystery, fear and anxiety around the inpatient rehab part of the stroke recovery journey.

Taking Care When Treating Atrial Fibrillation

A few years ago, several new anticoagulants were approved by the FDA. Because they are easier to use, with fewer side effects, their popularity has surged — but they aren’t entirely without risk.

Crowdsourcing a Cure

Stroke can be life-altering. While many of the risk factors of stroke are modifiable, scientists are beginning to work with individuals, like you, to look closer at other factors, such as genetics, diet, daily routines, and the environment.

Grieving the Old Self, Embracing the New

Stroke often changes a survivor’s ability to do things that are important to them, and the loss of what you personally, dearly valued in yourself can be very challenging. Survivor Rachel Scanlon Henry shares how her own process might’ve been better supported if she’d been conscious of the stages of grieving as she experienced them.

Understanding Common Post-Stroke Medications

Understanding the purpose, potential side effects and risks of not taking your medicines as directed is important, whether they’re prescribed or over the counter. Let’s look at some of the most common medication therapies recommended following an ischemic stroke.
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See allReturning to Work

Stroke Survivor Goes Back to Work . . . for Herself

As I approach the eighth anniversary of being in private practice, I think about how it all came about and how if I hadn’t had a massive hemorrhagic stroke, I might not have been so bold as to open my own business.

The ADA Turns 25

Starting in the ’70s, the disability rights movement learned an important lesson from the civil rights movement and got organized. Their goals were the elimination of attitudinal, communication, transportation, policy and physical barriers so as to integrate people with disabilities into society.

Returning to Work After Stroke

For many younger survivors, going back to work is often the measure for recovery. Here's some excellent guidance if you're working toward getting back into the workplace.

Working My Way Back

My journey started on September 8, 1995 at 5:30 p.m. I was 47. I got up from my chair and said I did not feel good and then collapsed onto the floor.