Survival Journeys

Though strokes often have common effects, each one is also different. And each stroke survivor's journey is as unique as the individual themselves. Survival Journeys features stories by and about stroke survivors, sharing their experiences and insights.


 

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The Mother of Invention

Get to know the survival journey of Rosanna Radding, our Tips & Tricks columnist and founder of OneHandCan.com.

Uncommon Survivors

This companion piece to Uncommon Causes profiles several survivors who experienced strokes due to less common causes.

A Survivor in the Senate

Stroke survivors do not always return to work. Even when they do, it’s safe to say that they are not welcomed back by the Vice President of the United States.

Moving From the Minors to the Majors

Sometimes you strike out more times than you hit a home run. Life is about handling the strikeouts — adjusting your strategy after each pitch, adjusting your swing after a strike and being ready for the next pitch.

Teri Ackerson's Why

Being a stroke coordinator for a hospital in the Kansas City area helped her know what to do and stay calm when she experienced a stroke herself in 2013.

Working My Way Back

My journey started on September 8, 1995 at 5:30 p.m. I was 47. I got up from my chair and said I did not feel good and then collapsed onto the floor.

Poems of a Recovery Journey

As a rehab patient, I found a spiral notebook and kept a journal of my feelings and experiences during this totally unexpected set of circumstances. I wrote these three poems to share encouragement with anyone who needs it.

Walking the Runway to Recovery

2011 was a tough year - but after surviving kidney failure, a stroke, seizures, high blood pressure and a Lupus diagnosis, Deborah Williams advice is to never give up.

When You Can't Just Do It: Motivation Magic

“When I saw that I could still entertain people, that’s when the light went on that there was hope for the future, even if I had to do it from a wheelchair. Entertaining people gave me a purpose.” He did his first post-stroke magic show at a school three months after leaving rehab.

Survive Thrive & Lead

Dr. Donna Arnett, past president of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, has a couple of firsts to her credit: the first epidemiologist to be president of the organization and the first stroke survivor.
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Archive »For Survivors

Half a World Away: Visual Field Cuts

Strokes can often affect vision and processing of visual information. The most common visual deficit is hemianopia, or visual field cut. Understand different types of field cuts and learn about potential treatments.

Parenting Young Children After Stroke

Parenting gets complicated when the parent also has to manage the dynamics of stroke recovery. Juggling the calendar of family activities with personal medical appointments is just the beginning.

Caring for a Survivor with Aphasia

Mary and Reed Harris have been partners in Reed’s stroke recovery for nearly ten years. Personal relationships rely on communication so Reed’s global aphasia was met with more than a few challenges. They share their story, tips and advice to others for living with the effects of aphasia day-to-day.

Seeking a Cause

Stroke survivor Robert Cull’s medical team was persistent in trying to identify why he’d had a stroke and made an important discovery about his health in the process.

Learning to Swim Again

Of course I knew how to swim, but what could I do now with one arm and one functioning leg?
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See allReturning to Work

Stroke Survivor Goes Back to Work . . . for Herself

As I approach the eighth anniversary of being in private practice, I think about how it all came about and how if I hadn’t had a massive hemorrhagic stroke, I might not have been so bold as to open my own business.

The ADA Turns 25

Starting in the ’70s, the disability rights movement learned an important lesson from the civil rights movement and got organized. Their goals were the elimination of attitudinal, communication, transportation, policy and physical barriers so as to integrate people with disabilities into society.

Returning to Work After Stroke

For many younger survivors, going back to work is often the measure for recovery. Here's some excellent guidance if you're working toward getting back into the workplace.

Working My Way Back

My journey started on September 8, 1995 at 5:30 p.m. I was 47. I got up from my chair and said I did not feel good and then collapsed onto the floor.