Survival Journeys

Though strokes often have common effects, each one is also different. And each stroke survivor's journey is as unique as the individual themselves. Survival Journeys features stories by and about stroke survivors, sharing their experiences and insights.


 

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Enjoying My Second Chance

At age 13 I experienced a grand mal seizure. I was scared to death. Seizures were soon a common occurrence in my life for the next 34 years. Eventually during one hospital stay it was discovered that I had an arteriovenous malformation (AVM).

But You Look So Normal

By now I am used to the odd looks people give me when I say that I’ve had a stroke.

Confessions of the Lucky One

I survived a stroke in 1994 at age 51. The physical aspects of recuperating from that stroke were no easy task, but the mental deficits continue to be more difficult.

1000 to One: The Cory Weissman Story

What’s the difference between one and a thousand? For Cory Weissman,it’s a whole new life.

The Mother of Invention

Get to know the survival journey of Rosanna Radding, our Tips & Tricks columnist and founder of OneHandCan.com.

Uncommon Survivors

This companion piece to Uncommon Causes profiles several survivors who experienced strokes due to less common causes.

A Survivor in the Senate

Stroke survivors do not always return to work. Even when they do, it’s safe to say that they are not welcomed back by the Vice President of the United States.

Moving From the Minors to the Majors

Sometimes you strike out more times than you hit a home run. Life is about handling the strikeouts — adjusting your strategy after each pitch, adjusting your swing after a strike and being ready for the next pitch.

Teri Ackerson's Why

Being a stroke coordinator for a hospital in the Kansas City area helped her know what to do and stay calm when she experienced a stroke herself in 2013.

Working My Way Back

My journey started on September 8, 1995 at 5:30 p.m. I was 47. I got up from my chair and said I did not feel good and then collapsed onto the floor.
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Archive »For Survivors

Helping Others Understand: Post-Stroke Fatigue

Stroke is unpredictable, but one extremely common effect of stroke is fatigue. Some studies indicate that as many as 70 percent of survivors experience fatigue at some time following their stroke.

Helping Others Understand: Post-Stroke Fatigue Info Sheet

It can sometimes be hard for family and friends to recognize how much post-stroke fatigue may be affecting a survivor. We’ve created a quick-reference sheet that you can share with family and friends to help them better understand.

Am I Losing Ground?

Survivors are sometimes concerned that they are losing function after they leave formal therapy – making gains while working with therapists, but feeling loss of strength and function even when continuing to do exercises at home. Rehabilitation experts weigh in on the topic.

Dr. Glen Gillen Weighs In on 'Am I Losing Ground?'

Occupational therapist, Dr. Glen Gillen, adds his perspectives to those of the physical therapists featured in "Am I Losing Ground?" in this supplemental web-only feature.

Half a World Away: Visual Field Cuts

Strokes can often affect vision and processing of visual information. The most common visual deficit is hemianopia, or visual field cut. Understand different types of field cuts and learn about potential treatments.
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See allReturning to Work

Stroke Survivor Goes Back to Work . . . for Herself

As I approach the eighth anniversary of being in private practice, I think about how it all came about and how if I hadn’t had a massive hemorrhagic stroke, I might not have been so bold as to open my own business.

The ADA Turns 25

Starting in the ’70s, the disability rights movement learned an important lesson from the civil rights movement and got organized. Their goals were the elimination of attitudinal, communication, transportation, policy and physical barriers so as to integrate people with disabilities into society.

Returning to Work After Stroke

For many younger survivors, going back to work is often the measure for recovery. Here's some excellent guidance if you're working toward getting back into the workplace.

Working My Way Back

My journey started on September 8, 1995 at 5:30 p.m. I was 47. I got up from my chair and said I did not feel good and then collapsed onto the floor.