Survival Journeys

Though strokes often have common effects, each one is also different. And each stroke survivor's journey is as unique as the individual themselves. Survival Journeys features stories by and about stroke survivors, sharing their experiences and insights.


 

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Gracie Doran's Why

At the age of 10, Gracie Doran had a stroke due to cavernous hemangioma. But that hasn't kept her from doing what she loves. “Dance is my passion in life,” Gracie said.

This is MY Ballgame

"One stroke, two strokes, three strokes; I refuse to go out." A survivor's poem.

Raising the Voice of Young Survivors

Amy Edmunds shares the story of having a stroke at the age of 45 and how it inspired her to start an organization focused on the needs of stroke survivors under the age of 65.

Mom’s Stroke Inspires NBA Star

Before Paul George was a two-time NBA All-Star, before he was a player on the Indiana Pacers, before he was the tenth player picked in the NBA draft or led his high school basketball team to a league championship, he was the 6-year-old son of a stroke survivor. His mother Paulette’s stroke at age 37 would change his life forever.

Jenna Tischer's Why

On May 12, 2014 — Mother’s Day — Jenna Tischer of Warrensburg, Missouri, was savoring her last week of maternity leave following the birth of her second child. That night she had a massive stroke.

Holy Limps & Holy Scars

Like the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz, I got a new heart, one filled with compassion for those facing similar struggles.

Comedian Stroke Survivor Celebrates Column's 10th Anniversary

Many of our readers think the only reason we publish Stroke Connection is so they can read John Kawie’s column, "Life at the Curb." This issue marks 10 years that John has succeeded at what seems impossible — making stroke funny.

Jan Thomas's Why

She woke up in the hospital, terribly confused and unable to speak. She didn’t know that she had had a stroke and with it, aphasia.

Determined to Make a New Normal

I’ve learned that every person’s journey is different. When I realized that my recovery was not going to happen overnight, I cried myself to sleep for a month. After that, I was determined to make a "new normal."

Stroke Survivor Eric Barr Shares a Piece of His Mind

One year after a near-death experience and three strokes, this professor of acting rolled on stage to do a one-man show about his experience.
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Archive »For Survivors

Half a World Away: Visual Field Cuts

Strokes can often affect vision and processing of visual information. The most common visual deficit is hemianopia, or visual field cut. Understand different types of field cuts and learn about potential treatments.

Parenting Young Children After Stroke

Parenting gets complicated when the parent also has to manage the dynamics of stroke recovery. Juggling the calendar of family activities with personal medical appointments is just the beginning.

Caring for a Survivor with Aphasia

Mary and Reed Harris have been partners in Reed’s stroke recovery for nearly ten years. Personal relationships rely on communication so Reed’s global aphasia was met with more than a few challenges. They share their story, tips and advice to others for living with the effects of aphasia day-to-day.

Seeking a Cause

Stroke survivor Robert Cull’s medical team was persistent in trying to identify why he’d had a stroke and made an important discovery about his health in the process.

Learning to Swim Again

Of course I knew how to swim, but what could I do now with one arm and one functioning leg?
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See allReturning to Work

Stroke Survivor Goes Back to Work . . . for Herself

As I approach the eighth anniversary of being in private practice, I think about how it all came about and how if I hadn’t had a massive hemorrhagic stroke, I might not have been so bold as to open my own business.

The ADA Turns 25

Starting in the ’70s, the disability rights movement learned an important lesson from the civil rights movement and got organized. Their goals were the elimination of attitudinal, communication, transportation, policy and physical barriers so as to integrate people with disabilities into society.

Returning to Work After Stroke

For many younger survivors, going back to work is often the measure for recovery. Here's some excellent guidance if you're working toward getting back into the workplace.

Working My Way Back

My journey started on September 8, 1995 at 5:30 p.m. I was 47. I got up from my chair and said I did not feel good and then collapsed onto the floor.