Help Your Patients Make the Connection

Now offered exclusively as a digital publication, Stroke Connection is available virtually everywhere. With a desktop digital edition and FREE apps for Apple and Android smartphones and tablets and for Kindle Fire — you can have Stroke Connection with you wherever you are. Or if you prefer, you can enjoy the magazine on the Stroke Connection website.

Stroke Connection is free and published four times per year.

When your patients or their caregivers sign up for Stroke Connection with their email address, they'll receive our monthly SC e-Extra newsletter. They'll receive notification of new issues via the newsletter as well as great information for stroke families every month in between issues. 


Free Reproducible Handout for Patients


 

Download this free promotional flyer and print as often as you need to hand to patients, make available in waiting rooms or include in discharge packets. 

Or direct your patients to subscribe here.

 

 


Download & Share the FREE Stroke Connection App

 

Now offered exclusively as a digital publication, Stroke Connection is available virtually everywhere. Including on your favorite smartphone or tablet

App features: 

⇒ Notifications when new issues are available

⇒ Stroke related news stories delivered via feed in the app between issues

⇒ View issue in page layout view or select straight forward text view option

⇒ Access our fully searchable back issue archive

⇒ Easily share articles with others via email, social media or text messaging

⇒ Articles adjust to the size and orientation of any screen for reading ease

 

Click on your app store icon below to download the free app today!

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Revisiting PT After 15 Years

Stroke survivor Connie Stagnaro headed back to physical therapy 15 years after her stroke after surgery to correct a stroke-related condition. But this time was different than the first.

Speechless No More!

For Phyllis Weiss, a 65-year-old survivor from Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, each sound she painstakingly — but patiently — forms is a triumph. In her quiet, halting delivery is an underlying strength and vitality. Qualities that carried her through an entire year of silence.

Gratitude Schmatitude

Survivor, Quenby Schuyler, had never been a particularly grateful type of person. After her stroke, her take on gratitude changed.

Sharing My WOW

Life-altering events force us to look back on our lives. That was especially true for me during the first four months after my hemorrhagic stroke in 2013 at age 44.

Expressing Creativity Through Music After Stroke

Music lights up the whole brain, “like the sky during a fireworks display,” said Kyle Wilhelm, MA, MTBC in the Music Therapy Services department of West Music. This seems to bring delight as many survivors experience firsthand.
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See all Featured Tips

Preparing for a Backup Caregiver

Thinking ahead and preparing for a backup caregiver can help ease some of the anxiety for you and your loved one and assure that things go smoothly while you are away.

Managing the Cost of Prescription Medicines

Most stroke survivors leave the hospital with several prescriptions. The cost of these can be a significant blow to any budget. Find out about resources that may help.

Kitchen Mobility, Kitchen Stability

Recently, I was asked a question about a subject I hadn’t paid much attention to in a while: balance, the kind of balance it takes to move around a kitchen and reach for things safely. Stroke definitely can affect your sense of balance. It did mine in the early post-stroke years, and I did have to take special care in the kitchen. Here are some suggestions about cooking and balance.

Strokes, Strikes & Spares

A few years after his stroke, David Layton rediscovered bowling. He’s setting and achieving new goals for himself and having a great time doing it. Check out his video with tips for one-handed bowling.

Fishing with One Paw

Kim Mullens is an exuberant spirit — you can hear it in her voice, punctuated with laughter and memorable phrases: "There are good days and bad days — sometimes you’re the windshield, sometimes you’re the bug." In 1995 when she was 38, a tear in her carotid artery left her "with one paw," that kept her from working because she couldn’t climb into the cab of the CAT 966 earth-moving equipment she operated.