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Tedy's Team Turns 10: A Stroke on the Ice

After homework, she didn’t watch TV or play video games, she practiced her stick handling in the driveway or cellar with a rubber ball and hockey stick. People began to refer to her as an "Olympic hopeful." All that changed when 12-year-old Jamie had a left-brain ischemic stroke on Aug. 9, 2009.

Enjoying My Second Chance

At age 13 I experienced a grand mal seizure. I was scared to death. Seizures were soon a common occurrence in my life for the next 34 years. Eventually during one hospital stay it was discovered that I had an arteriovenous malformation (AVM).

But You Look So Normal

By now I am used to the odd looks people give me when I say that I’ve had a stroke.

Confessions of the Lucky One

I survived a stroke in 1994 at age 51. The physical aspects of recuperating from that stroke were no easy task, but the mental deficits continue to be more difficult.

1000 to One: The Cory Weissman Story

What’s the difference between one and a thousand? For Cory Weissman,it’s a whole new life.
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Managing Caregiver Expectations: Family & Friends

The first of a three-part series on how to use journaling as a method to help manage expectations across different aspects of your caregiving experience.

Expanding Comfort Zones

It is no mystery that friends and family drift — they feel awkward because they see how hard it is for the survivor to communicate. They don’t want to aggravate him or her nor do they know how to help. For the most part, they don’t understand that aphasia is a language disorder, not a thinking or reasoning disorder. We are all so accustomed to speaking that people don’t naturally understand that intelligence and emotion are distinct from speech.